Lisa Warburton, Head of Department -Computer Science, Rossett School

Lisa is the head of the Computer Science at Rossett School in Harrogate. Lisa trained to be a teacher at Leeds Trinity and has been teaching for a year now.

I love having the opportunity to motivate and enthuse the next generation of computer scientists.”

 

 What do you enjoy most about teaching?

I enjoy finding creative ways to teach students to understand and solve problems, seeing the students exchanging ideas to grow together and develop new skills is the best form of job satisfaction.

What inspired me to be a teacher is the passion I have for my subject, having worked in industry within my subject area for over 12 years, I felt that I would be able to bring a difficult subject to life sharing real world experiences. I love having the opportunity to motivate and enthuse the next generation of computer scientist preparing them with not only subject knowledge but key skills in order to make them ready to succeed for their chosen journeys outside the classroom.

What do you like most about the school you teach in?

It’s great to work with colleagues and students that care about their school and doing a good job is number one priority.

I enjoy the freedom that the school encourages to explore new ideas and the collaboration between departments to make sure we are giving the students every opportunity to succeed.

What advice would you give to people who are thinking about training to be a teacher?

Teaching is a challenging but rewarding career. Be passionate about your subject, be willing to always go the extra mile and be prepared for the best rollercoaster ride that is teaching.

What do you like about North Yorkshire?

Originally from Lancashire I feel the best thing about North Yorkshire is very much like the county offers diverse lifestyles and landscapes, there are also many opportunities to teach in diverse schools that suit a wide range of teachers and teaching styles.

Mark Pears, IT Teacher, Rossett School

Mark is an IT teacher at Rossett School in Harrogate. Mark also teaches Computing Science & Economics and Business Studies. He trained to be a teacher at Leeds Trinity and has been teaching for 10 years now.

“You get to influence a lot of young people’s lives in a small way every single day.”

 

What do you enjoy most about teaching?

What I enjoy about teaching is a combination of factors. Firstly, schools tend to be cheerful and positive places with the optimism and vivaciousness that young people convey. I choose to make my environment a relaxed one because that’s when students learn best. Secondly you get to influence a lot of young people’s lives in a small way every single day, and occasionally in a big way: you get to choose the degree of influence you have via your demeanour, your enthusiasm, your passion for the topic, your expectations, your standards, your rapport with and respect for young students. These things matter and really do make a difference whether you think so or not. Thirdly, I didn’t realise it but in my previous sales and IT careers the aspects I’d enjoyed most were when I was helping other people. That has always given me genuine job satisfaction. Hence teaching was a logical destination for me.

What do you like most about the school you teach in?

The students are on my wavelength and I hope I am on theirs. The staff are friendly and supportive and on the whole we, as teachers, are allowed to get on with our work without hindrance. We are encouraged and given free rein to try out new methods and ideas. The variety of subjects and extra-curricular activities and trips on offer here makes the school an inspiring community to be a part of.

What advice would you give to people who are thinking about training to be a teacher?

Becoming a teacher is an adventure, which like any good adventure has its ups and downs. However the ups far outweigh the downs. If the teaching seed has already germinated in your mind then you must find the courage to give it a go. If you get the initial buzz I did when I tried my first 10 minute lesson then you won’t regret the path this rewarding career will take you down. You don’t just get out of it what you put into it. If you’re a hard worker (and often that means working smartly) then this career gives back tenfold.

What do you like about North Yorkshire?

The quality of life and open space. The friendly people. The proximity to stunning countryside even if living in the middle of Leeds. Pubs, eateries, craft ales and cycling facilities.

Mike Symes, Assistant Head of Science, St Aidan’s C of E High School

Mike is the Assistant Head of Science (Chemistry) at St Aidan’s C of E High School. He trained to be a teacher at York University and has been teaching for 7 years now.

"Seeing tangible results, moments of realisation on the face of a student who has not yet realised their potential is an incomparably satisfying."

What do you enjoy most about teaching?

"From day one having the opportunity to close the door and be responsible for my own work and the development of youngsters was very important. Seeing tangible results, moments of realisation on the face of a student who has not yet realised their potential is an incomparably satisfying. I have reached a stage now in my career at which students are now coming back to visit the school, or I may simply bump into them, and they share what progress they have made and the careers they are entering. It is always exciting hearing what they are up to and knowing I have played my part in getting them there."

What do you like most about the school you teach in?

"St Aidan’s C of E High School is a wonderful place to work. As a non-selective school the profile of a student varies so much, which makes it both rewarding and challenging helping a range of students to progress. The school has a caring, supportive, positive environment that makes working here a pleasure. Having the opportunity to teach through all Key Stages is important. Our associated sixth form is very large, meaning as a Chemistry teacher I get to teach a number of A level groups. As well as this I have consistently had the opportunity to progress with my career, taking on a number of teaching and learning responsibilities as well as external professional roles beyond my classroom teaching job."

What advice would you give to people who are thinking about training to be a teacher?

"Make sure you are entering the profession for the right reasons. Go into some schools, speak to teachers. Some people view teaching as a steady job with a good wage and solid pension. These points are true, but unless you are a resilient person who can deal with emotional stresses well, it could be an option that needs further consideration. Go down the correct route. Consider different training providers and check that they deliver the course in a way that will work for you. "

What do you like about North Yorkshire?

"The people! The majority of people I come across are in the profession for the right reasons. The people within North Yorkshire are genuine and straight talking; avoiding rhetoric that can make working with people difficult. "

 

 

Donal Hale, English Teacher, Barlby High School

Donal is a Teacher of English and Middle leader of learning and teaching at Barlby High School. He trained to be a teacher at King’s College London and has been teaching for six years.

“Remember always- you are a master of your own classroom”

 

What do you enjoy most about teaching?

“The idea that one can learn something about themselves and the world around them through the study of literary texts. My inspiration was to be the facilitator for such realisations.”

 

What do you like most about the school you teach in?

“My department, which has a strong leader and is working with me to help drive forward positive changes across the school.”

 

What advice would you give to people who are thinking about training to be a teacher?

“Three things: 1. Do it for the right reasons- holidays are great, but won’t make it worth it. 2. Try to maintain a sense of idealism (where possible) amongst the day to day grind.3. Remember always (despite pre-conceptions that suggest otherwise)- you are a master of your own classroom.”

 

What do you like about North Yorkshire?

“The countryside- a rural idyll which could not be further from the urbanisation of London!”

Paul Offord, English Teacher, Scalby School

Paul is an English Teacher at Scalby School and is currently working across George Pindar and Graham School too. He trained to be a teacher at York University and has been teaching for the past 15 years.

“Teaching is one of the most rewarding things that you can do. There is no doubt that there is a lot of hard work involved but you can influence young people’s lives for the better every day.”

What do you enjoy most about Teaching?

“That thrilling feeling in a lesson when students are so absorbed in their learning and when they become selfmotivated to the point that they begin inspiring others to excel. I really enjoy working alongside other colleagues and facilitating their development and improvement in different areas of their practice.”

What do you like most about the School you teach in?

“The students here at Scalby are creative, polite and hardworking. I really like the team-spirit that exists here as well as the full commitment of SLT to supporting excellent order around the schools and in the classrooms. I also like the freedom that staff have to explore and innovate different approaches within their practice”

What advice would you give to people who are thinking about training to be a teacher?

“Teaching is one of the most rewarding things that you can do. There is no doubt that there is a lot of hard work involved but you can influence young people’s lives for the better every day. Be organised with your time and embrace moments of struggle as opportunities to learn. Only by getting things wrong can you become a better teacher”.

What do you like about North Yorkshire?

“We moved from Brighton as a family. One of the reasons was to reconnect with North Yorkshire and to provide our children with an opportunity to get to know a new landscape. There are so many things that a young family can do here and you are never more than 30 minutes’ drives from somewhere breath-taking”

Stuart Wiggans, Subject Leader, Settle College

Stuart is a subject leader in RE, PSHCe and Psychology at Settle College. He trained to be a teacher at St Martin’s College, Lancaster and has been teaching for 28 years.

“Be yourself. The best version of you will always be a better teacher than an imitation of someone else.”

 What do you enjoy most about Teaching?

“Knowing that today could be the day that I make a positive difference in a young person’s life, sometimes by something as simple as a kind word at the right time. Accepting that not every day willb be like that, but understanding that at the very least I can be a reassuring constant in what can be the otherwise uncertain, and often insecure, experience of childhood and teenage years.”

 

What do you like most about the School you teach in?

“The positive relationships between staff and the pupils.”

 

What advice would you give to people who are thinking about training to be a teacher?

“As in life, be yourself. The best version of you will always be a better teacher than an imitation of someone else.”

 

What do you like about North Yorkshire?

By national standards, relatively small schools in a beautiful and calming environment that help to make all of the above possible.”